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Bacterial Skin Infections

Bacterial Skin Infections - How to prevent?

Bacterial Skin Infections - Treatments

IMPETIGO:

Treatment depends on the severity and extent of the infection and include:
  • Antibacterial body wash or soap
  • Soaks with potassium permanganate (PP) or normal saline
  • Antibiotic cream two to three times a day for seven to 10 days or until the lesions resolve
  • A course of oral antibiotics for seven to 10 days

If the infection recurs, and if Staph aureus is found in the nose swab, the doctor may prescribe topical antibiotics to be applied into the nose, and anti-bacterial soap. It is important to follow the instructions given by the doctor.

ERYSIPELAS / CELLULITIS:

Treatment depends upon the severity of the infection.

For milder infections, a course of oral antibiotics for one to two weeks may be prescribed. It is important that the course of antibiotics is completed.

If the infection is not improving with oral medications, or if the infection is more severe, hospital admission for antibiotic injections may be required for a few days. These injections are given directly into the vein (intravenous or IV) through a plastic tube (cannula).

Other treatment measures that may be required include:
  • Rest and elevate the affected area.
  • Soaks with potassium permanganate (PP) or normal saline
  • Pain-relief medications e.g. paracetamol

BOILS / ABSCESS:

Treatment depends upon the severity of the infection.

For milder infections, a course of oral antibiotics for one to two weeks may be prescribed. It is important that the course of antibiotics is completed.

If the infection is not improving with oral medications, or if pus is expressed from the boil, a minor operation to “open up” the boil may be performed by the doctor (incision and drainage). After the minor operation, the wound is left open and daily dressing is required until the wound heals up in one to two weeks.

For more severe cases, your child may be admitted to the hospital for a few days for antibiotic injections to be administered. These injections are given directly into the vein (intravenous or IV) through a plastic tube (cannula).

Bacterial Skin Infections - Preparing for surgery

Bacterial Skin Infections - Post-surgery care

The information provided is not intended as medical advice. Terms of use. Information provided by SingHealth
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